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Religious Literature Collection


A Collection of the World's Myths, Legends, Religions, and Sacred Works.

 
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Four Great Vows

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Ordinary-beings are innumerable I vow to liberate them all Defilements are endless I vow to eliminate them all Buddha's teachings are unlimited I vow to learn them all The ways of enlightenment are supreme

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A 5 Minute Introduction to Buddhism

By: Venerable S. Dhammika

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: The word comes from 'budhi', 'to awaken'. It has its origins about 2,500 years ago when Siddhata Gotama, known as the Buddha, was himself awakened (enlightened) at the age of 35. Is Buddhism a Religion? To many, Buddhism goes beyond religion and is more of a philosophy or 'way of life'. It is a philosophy because philosophy 'means love of wisdom' and the Buddhist path can be summed up as:

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Sixty Songs of Milarepa

By: Garma C.C. Chang

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: On previous pages Jestun Milarepa is shown Sitting at ease in front of the cave at Ghadaya near the Tidet-Napal border.

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The Sixth Patriarch's Dharma Jewel Platform Sutra

By: Master Tripitaka Hua

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: All rights reserved, including the right to reproduce this book or transmit it in any form or by any means mechanical or electronic, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review.

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Practicing the Eightfold Path : A Zen Approach

By: Gary L. Ray

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: The Eightfold Path is the core doctrine of Buddhism. Like a doctor, the Buddha prescribed the Eightfold Path for the cure of all suffering and impermanence (Dukkha). Shakyamuni Buddha proclaimed: What is the way which leads to the cessation of suffering? The way is the Eightfold Noble Path itself...

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Eight Steps to Freedom

By: Stephen Echard-Musgrave, Roshi

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: It is not possible to write anything concerning spiritual practice that is meaningful unless that which is written comes from one's own experience. Over the last twenty years I have been involved in trying to find a Buddhist practice that adequately relates to living in modern society. A practice which would be in Dogen Zenji's words, an authentic practice. There is a temptation to either modernize Buddhist practice to the point it no longer contains adequate di...

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Mindfulness

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Mindfulness is the ground in which meditation is rooted. It is the source of realization of all other paths. Right mindfulness draws attention away from the fantasies of the ego, and into the reality of the present. When it is applied, there is no possibility of wrong views, resolution, speech, livelihood or effort. This Buddhist mindfulness sees the world, both objective and subjective, as process and does not lose itself in a sense of false identity. There is ...

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Right Meditation

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: The final path of the way of the Buddhas is meditation, the practice of all the Buddhas and patriarchs. While meditation is the most straight forward and simple of the eight paths, meditation is also the most removed from our everyday life. We employ world view, intentions, speech, work at a vocation, choose courses of moral action, and apply some mindfulness in our everyday life whether we are on a spiritual path or not. We do not, however, meditate as a natura...

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The Dharma Student in the West Is Faced with a Number of Dilemmas

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: The Dharma student in the west is faced with a number of dilemmas. The problem of how to adapt our spiritual practice to this life is not an easy question to answer. As long as we live in modern society, we have to reflect that reality in our lives, and there is so much tradition surrounding Buddhist practice that it is difficult to ascertain what is pertinent to our spiritual growth and what is not.

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Right Views

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: In the beginning there is the idea. The seed from which all else germinates. In spiritual practice, the view we hold of the world is certain to dictate the course of our actions. In Buddhism, the path of right view or right idea begins with a basic understanding of the spiritual laws of existence. The noble four fold truths: 1.) that to be alive is to experience dissatisfaction 2.) that this dissatisfaction is borne of attachment to desire 3.) that these desires...

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Right Resolution

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Once a person has attained a view of the world that accurately perceives the nature of spiritual reality, they understand it is necessary to live a life appropriate to this vision. Since no one is possessed of perfect virtue it will be necessary to make a commitment to a course of action that will enable a person to transform themselves according to this new commitment.

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Good Will Is the Best Medicine to Cure the Disease of Anger and Hatred

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Good will is the best medicine to cure the disease of anger and hatred. The medicine of good will is found in the Buddhist term metta, which has its root in the word for friend. This concept has much in common with the Confucian term Jen or human heartedness. Both terms describe a relationship to others that is predicated upon a feeling of genuine sympathy and warmth for an individual, not based on our relationship to him, but through an understanding of the hum...

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Right Speech

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: The noble path of perfected speech is the doorway to an effective moral behavior, because moral practice begins with the control of ones speech. For a dharma student morality is something which is intrinsic to his way of being in the world. There is no external power, in the form of God, who one has to appease. We act with moral conviction because we understand the connection between moral action and its immediate effect on our well being.

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Right Action

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Right action is the fourth path that ennobles, and is a direct expression of the spiritual energy of the first three paths. As we have seen the first three paths link together to form a symbiotic triad to support one another. The supporting energy then manifests itself in life outside of the mind and speech, in bodily action. If we have properly prepared the groundwork of mental morality in the first three paths then our behavior in the world will follow as a direct result.

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Right Livelihood

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Once we have disciplined our actions in the world to correspond to our new spiritual view and resolution, we will want to assure that the way we earn our living is also consistent with the rest of our practice. This concern expresses itself in the fourth noble path, Right Livelihood. A person's vocation is so much a representation of their own life energy that we often define a man by his profession. John is a policeman, Joan is a fireman, is the way we describe...

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Right Effort

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: The first three noble paths deal exclusively with the accumulation of spiritual understanding and the moral restraint that this knowledge engenders. There is nothing in the first five paths that differs radically in approach from the moral teachings of western theologically based religion. The main difference in approach is found in the total emphasis of Buddhism on the process of self transformation as being self generated rather than other generated. Other tha...

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Life of the Buddha for Secondary Students

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: More than 2,500 year ago, there was a king called Suddhodana. He married a beautiful Koliyan Princess named Maha maya.

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A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma

By: Acariya Anuruddha

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Pali Text originally edited and translated by Mahathera Narada

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Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: This file is generated from the Sri Lanka Buddha Jayanti Tripitaka Series published under the patronage of the Sri Lanka Government.

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A Manual of Abhidhammattha (Abhidhammattha Sangaha)

By: Narada Maha Thera

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: ABHIDHAMMA is the Higher Teaching of the Buddha, some-times referred to as the ultimate Teaching (Parammattha Desana).

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